Molly Grace

molly.grace@zoo.ox.ac.uk
molly.k.grace

 

Molly joined ICCS in October 2017, working as a postdoc on the IUCN Green List of Species initiative. Her postdoc is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (supporting Molly as a Knowledge Exchange Fellow) and by Global Wildlife Conservation.

She began her career in ecology as an undergraduate at Duke University, working in Steve Nowicki's lab with Rindy Anderson (now at Florida Atlantic University) studying how traffic noise affects songbird communication. She pursued this interest in traffic noise and road ecology during her PhD with Reed Noss at the University of Central Florida (completed in 2017), which focused on the behavior of humans and amphibians with respect to roads and road stimuli.

 

I am broadly trained in Conservation Biology/ Ecology, but the focus of my research so far has been Transportation Ecology. I am drawn to Transportation Ecology because it is such an applied field and because of its emphasis on collaboration around the world.

 

 

molly

Molly is a member of the IUCN Task Force on Assessing Conservation Success, which is responsible for the development of the Green List of Species.

The Green List will be a standardised way to measure species recovery and the role that conservation actions play.

Read more about the programme Molly is working on here

 

 

Akcakaya, R et al. 2018. Quantifying Species Recovery and Conservation Success: a practical framework for expanding the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Conservation Biology, Early Online doi: 10.1111/cobi.13112. Open Access.

Grace, M, RF Noss. 2018. Selective avoidance of anthropogenic noise by anuran amphibians. Animal Conservation, Early Online doi: 10.1111/acv.12400.

Grace, M, et al. 2017. Reducing the threat of wildlife-vehicle collisions during peak tourism periods using a Roadside Animal Detection System. Accident Anal. & Prevention, 109: 55-61.
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Grace, M, et al. 2017. Roadside Abundance of Anurans within a Community Correlates with Reproductive Life History. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 5: 65. doi:10.3389/fevo.2017.00065. Open Access.
 

Grace, M, et al. 2015. Testing alternative designs for a roadside animal detection system using a driving simulator. Nature Conservation 11: 61–77. doi:10.3897/natureconservation.11.4420. Open Access.

Grace, M, RC Anderson. 2014. No frequency shift in the “D” notes of Carolina chickadee calls in response to traffic noise. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 69(2): 253-263.

 

 

REPORTS


Smith, DJ, MK Grace, A Miller. 2015. Assessing the Effectiveness and Reliability of the Roadside Animal Detection System on US Highway 41 near the Turner River in Collier County. Final Report. Contract No. BDV37, TWO #2. Florida Department of Transportation, District One, Bartow, FL. 70 pp. + appendices.
 

Smith, DJ, MK Grace, HR Chasez, MJW Noss. 2015. State Road 40 Pre-Construction Wildlife Movement Monitoring: Areas A, B and F. Final Report, Contract No. BDK78, TWO #501- 3. Florida Department of Transportation, District Five, Deland, FL. 90 pp. + appendices.

 

*bold text= award-winning presentation

 

Talks

1. Grace, MK, DJ Smith, RF Noss. May 2017. Promise and Limitations of Roadside Animal Detection Systems. International Conference on Ecology and Transportation, Salt Lake City, UT.

 

2. Grace, MK, DJ Smith, RF Noss. September 2016. Acclimation of drivers to a Roadside Animal Detection System. Infra Eco Network Europe, University of Lyon, Lyon, France.

 

3. Grace, MK and RF Noss. August 2016. Do anuran amphibians avoid traffic noise? An experimental field study. Ecological Society of America, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

 

4. Grace, MK, DJ Smith, RF Noss. July 2016. Patterns of Anuran Abundance near Roads are Explained by Life History Traits. Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, New Orleans, LA.

 

5. Grace, MK and RF Noss. March 2016. Assessing the Impact of Traffic Noise on Amphibian Populations. Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, University of Florida, Tallahassee, FL.

 

6. Grace, MK and RF Noss. February 2016. How does traffic noise affect anuran populations? A "phantom road" approach. Southeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Nauvoo, AL.

 

 

7. Grace, MK and RF Noss. September 2015. Anurans as a model for investigating mechanisms by which traffic noise could reduce abundance of animal populations. International Conference on Ecology and Transportation, Raleigh, NC.

 

8. Grace, MK, DJ Smith, RF Noss. September 2014. Good enough, or room for improvement? Testing alternative designs for a roadside animal detection system using a driving simulator. Infra Eco Network Europe, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.

 

9. Grace, MK. March 2014. Using a driving simulator to test the effectiveness of an animal detection system in reducing wildlife-vehicle collisions. Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, Georgia State University.

 

10. Grace, MK and RC Anderson. March 2013. Acoustically complex notes: a strategy for effective songbird communication in a noisy world? Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, University of Central Florida.

 

11. Grace, MK. February 2013. Assessing the effectiveness of a roadside animal detection system using a driving simulator. CATSS-UTC Symposium on Transportation Issues and Simulation, University of Central Florida.

 

12. Grace, MK, C Montgomery, and R Reddy. November 2010. The influence of termitaria on woody plant communities in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Presentation to South African National Parks staff, Kruger National Park, South Africa.

 

 

Posters

1. Grace, MK, E Castaneda, V Leavings, R Noss. Traffic noise alters tadpole behavior, but does not affect growth. International Conference on Ecology and Transportation, Salt Lake City, UT.

 

2. Smith, N, MK Grace, K Arnaldi, C Bunner, K Guilfoyle, K Klein, K Mercier, J Napier, D Perry, K Phillips, R Rautsaw, G Stahelin, D Volk, and DG Jenkins. Toward a macroecology of roadkill. International Biogeography Society, Tucson, AZ.

 

3. Grace, MK, DJ Smith and RF Noss. October 2015. Roadside Animal Detection Systems: Lessons from the field and lab. Graduate Fellows Symposium, University of Central Florida.

 

4. Grace, MK and RF Noss. July 2015. How does traffic noise influence wildlife abundance? An investigation using anurans as a model. Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Reno, NV.

 

5. Grace, MK and RF Noss. March 2015. Deterrent, disruptive, or deadly – what effect does traffic noise have on wildlife populations? Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.

 

6. Grace, MK, DJ Smith and RF Noss. April 2014. Animal detection system on U.S. Highway 41 (Collier Co., FL) is effective at reducing wildlife-vehicle collisions in a simulated environment. Graduate Research Forum, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL.

 

7. Grace, MK, DJ Smith and RF Noss. June 2013. Use of a driving simulator to evaluate the effectiveness of a Roadside Animal Detection System on U.S. Highway 41, Collier County, Florida. International Conference on Ecology and Transportation, Scottsdale, AZ.

 

8. Grace, MK and RC Anderson. March 2013. Songbirds' acoustically complex notes may facilitate communication in noisy urban areas. Annual Meeting of the Association of Field Ornithologists, Archbold Biological Station, Venus, FL.

 

9. Grace, MK and RC Anderson. April 2012. Make them hear you: acoustically complex notes may help songbirds communicate in traffic noise. Duke University Visible Thinking symposium, Duke University.

 

10. Grace, MK. August 2009. Swamp sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) females may use song as an indicator of age in a potential mate. HHMI Undergraduate Research Fellowship Symposium, Duke University.

 

 

 

 

University of Oxford Knowledge Exchange Seed Fund. PI: Molly Grace. “Making the IUCN Green List work for government and business”. £3222, 1 April 2018 - 31 June 2018

National Environmental Research Council Knowledge Exchange Fellowship. “From Red to Green: Synthesizing research to create a metric of species conservation success for multiple end-users”. £34,412, 11 Sept. 2017 - 10 April 2018.

 

Molly Grace