World Oceans Day 2020

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This World Oceans Day we take a look at some of the research ICCS team members are doing in order to protect our Oceans.

 

Hollie Booth's research focuses on understanding and balancing trade-offs for practical and ethical shark conservation in the coral triangle. 

Her World Oceans Day message 

 

 

Wedgefish
 
Sharks, rays and their cartilaginous relatives are some of the world’s most threatened species. Around 1 in 4 are threatened with extinction. Bottlenose wedgefish, pictured below, are critically endangered and listed on CITES Appendix II. They are primarily threatened by overfishing, and their fins can fetch over $1,000 per kg in international trade.

 

Shark fishers are often villainized in shark conservation narratives. However many people, especially in small-scale fisheries in the global south, depend on sharks for their food security and livelihoods. Here people prepare ‘shark skewers’ for local consumption in Indonesia. It is the cheapest available form of animal protein in this area. You can read more about the socio-economic complexities of shark fisheries in Hollie’s paper: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.104994
Shark fishers are often villainized in shark conservation narratives. However many people, especially in small-scale fisheries in the global south, depend on sharks for their food security and livelihoods. Here people prepare ‘shark skewers’ for local consumption in Indonesia. It is the cheapest available form of animal protein in this area. You can read more about the socio-economic complexities of shark fisheries in Hollie’s paper: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.104994

 

By talking to shark fishers, and understanding their choices and motivations, we can work towards management options which help to reduce threats to sharks whilst also maintaining the well-being of vulnerable coastal communities
By talking to shark fishers, and understanding their choices and motivations, we can work towards management options which help to reduce threats to sharks whilst also maintaining the well-being of vulnerable coastal communities

 

By working with communities, and combining policy change with local-level implementation, it is possible to protect charismatic shark and ray species in fishery-dependent nations. Read more about Indonesia’s manta conservation success story here: https://www.iccs.org.uk/blog/assessing-impact-wildlife-trade-regulations and here https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2018/07/26/reducing-manta-ray-mortality-in-the-worlds-largest-targeted-manta-fishery/
By working with communities, and combining policy change with local-level implementation, it is possible to protect charismatic shark and ray species in fishery-dependent nations. Read more about Indonesia’s manta conservation success story here: https://www.iccs.org.uk/blog/assessing-impact-wildlife-trade-regulations and here https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2018/07/26/reducing-manta-ray-mortality-in-the-worlds-largest-targeted-manta-fishery/
 
The marine tourism sector and commercial fishing companies also have major roles to play in shark and ray conservation. If well managed, marine tourism can provide financial incentives for shark conservation https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00261/full, while fishing companies could strive for #NoNetLoss of sharks in their supply chains:    https://doi.org/10.1111/faf.12429
The marine tourism sector and commercial fishing companies also have major roles to play in shark and ray conservation. If well managed, marine tourism can provide financial incentives for shark conservation https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00261/full, while fishing companies could strive for #NoNetLoss of sharks in their supply chains:  
https://doi.org/10.1111/faf.12429

Learn more about Hollie's research here

 

 

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